About Us

Wirringa Baiya – means “Women Speak” which comes from the North-West New South Wales.

Wirringa – Women Central inland New South Wales.

Baiya – Speak – Sydney language groups include Eora, Dharug and Darkinjung from the North West New South Wales.

The Centre is situated within the Eora Nation, which is the land of the Cadigal-Wangal people.  The Eora Nation covers the Sydney area and is made up of approximately 29 Clans.

Vision

Wirringa Baiya’s long-term goal is to address the legal and human rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, children and youth in NSW.

The Centre aspires to:

  • maintain the provision, improvement, continual renewal and development of culturally appropriate legal services and resources
  • be a leading service provider for Aboriginal women, children and youth in the area of legal and human rights.

Core Values

In accomplishing it’s vision, Wirringa Baiya is committed to the following central ideals and principles, which are:

  • promoting and supporting the human and legal rights, especially relating to violence towards Aboriginal women, children and youth through legal advocacy and advice;
  • culturally appropriate service provision;
  • continuous quality improvement;
  • provision of efficient, responsive and effective administration of the Centre’s activities and services;
  • orientation to being leading-edge, socially aware and innovative and to seek to raise awareness in the field of legal and human rights
  • ethical legal and business practices
  • flexible approaches to the delivery of our services
  • provision of education and training programs to broaden the understanding of issues and matters relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, children and youth particularly in regards to legal, social and human rights;
  • to attract funding to the Centre to continue to pursue these values and to enable growth of service provision and capacity building.

Purpose

Wirringa Baiya is a Sydney based, non-government, not for profit community legal centre which covers all of New South Wales. Our Governing Committee consisted of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women from various locations in Australia.

Wirringa Baiya is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Legal Centre, incorporated under the Associations Incorporated Act 1984 (NSW). The Centre provides legal support, referral and advice to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, children and youth in the local community, and throughout NSW.

Wirringa Baiya is actively engaged in promoting and supporting Aboriginal women, children and youth in regards to their social, cultural, political, and human rights, through the provision of legal advocacy and services.

Wirringa Baiya contributes to the advancement and empowerment of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community through it’s work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, children and youth in the area of legal advice, support, advocacy, law reform and research.

Wirringa Baiya exists to provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, children and youth, in NSW, with a gender specific service which is sensitive to their culturally diverse needs. To provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who are victims of violence, with access to appropriate legal representation, advice and referral.

The service pays special attention to the needs of economically and socially disadvantaged Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, children and youth.

Wirringa Baiya’s main objectives are to:

  • provide legal advice, information and representation with special concern for victims of violence and sexual assault;
  • provide advocacy and support services dealing with violence issues;
  • provide community legal education to inform these women, children and youth of their legal rights, in relation to violence and associated issues;
  • initiate and promote research and evaluation of existing laws and legal processes and work towards law reform in areas of relevance;
  • work towards the empowerment of these women within the legal system and consequently within society;
  • support the principles of the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women;
  • to uphold the principles as identified under the UN Convention on the Rights of a Child.